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20121112
20121120
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. the speaker of the house john boehner says that he backed away from an agreed compromise on raising the debt limit. an article in "the new york times" magazine tends to support that charge the reason he painted a picture of obama standing firm and the negotiations as the apparent requirement for the resolution of the legislation approaches the end as it appears that even more are being forecast for the next congress if it will take an unusually skillful second term president to deliver solutions to the financial problems facing the nation. if the task rests on the shoulders of barack obama will he emulate wells and who wouldn't compromise or would he like eisenhower? regan, clinton and washington figured out how to win against the odds. of course to achieve the accommodation in congress he would need a lyndon johnson, tip o'neill or new gingrich to lead the congress majority that would follow. so what specifically what i recommend that he would do to avoid the challenges of the second term? he should appoint an intermediary with the skills of simpson-bowles to work with the congress on a leg
. john boehner still in the house for the time being at the treasury. the president is back in the white house and harry reid is in the senate with a few more seats. why should i believe this would end any more positively than the summer of 2011? >> because again i'm not going to try to talk to you in optimism but let's look at what's changed. you have republican leadership acknowledging for the first time in this debate in public that it's agreed to increase in revenues as part of an agreement that helps restore fiscal balance. that's a very important change. you can debate on what motivated that change, and of course it's true that approach has been a popular very substantial support among the american people. you have a much greater recognition that the economy would benefit on a carefully designed balanced agreement on fiscal reform and putting it off indefinitely is not good for the country. that's important, too. and i also think again if you listen carefully to what people are saying and what many politicians are saying with many elected representatives are saying there's a lot of
party voters. you know, mitch mcconnell has to worry about a primary collage in 2014, and boehner has to worry about a leadership challenge from the right so there's certainly a primp on what they can do. that said, the incentives have changed, and you saw chris christie's incentive changed, and there's, you know, the fiscal cliff creates different incentives, and i think the end of -- the end of that one term goal means that different republicans will start to have different incentives which means that on immigration, perhaps on a long term deficit deal, there will be avenues for potential cooperation. whether, you know, whether it takes, you know, more ass kickings or a real statesman to lead the republicans towards a different future, i think that depends on what happens over the next few years. >> i mean, i would add that, you know, there's a real brulalty to sitting in washington, that was just breathtaking to me. as a relative outsider, going into the mill and the buzz saw of the political apparatus in washington, and i think that, you know, it's bipartisan horribleness. it's no
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3